The Farming Column with Sam Walton

I dont think I have ever seen so much dust as I did this year in a field of wheat.
I dont think I have ever seen so much dust as I did this year in a field of wheat.

In the days of cutting corn with a binder, the only dust you saw was on threshing days after the stooks which made up the stacks of corn had matured.

It was never a problem out in the fields as the corn was cut before it was absolutely ripe and left in stooks to dry before being stacked.

I don’t think I have ever seen so much dust as I did this year in a field of wheat.

I took several pictures and the first one only showed a cloud of dust in the distance, I couldn’t even see the combine.

Thankfully the driver has an air conditioned cab so apart from being difficult to see his cutter bar, he did not suffer at all.

The modern machines, apart from being very efficient, protect the driver from the elements.

As a lad I well remember it was always my job to carry chaff from the threshing machine and it was more than a full time job to keep it clear.

It would be carried into a fold yard for cattle to munch with their turnips or into the chaff house for future use.

That was in the days before masks were common place so I used to tie a handkerchief round my mouth and nostrils and I well remember some of the men shouting Cissy!

Well Cissy or not at least I do not have farmers lung like some of them have who were being brave!

That was in the days when men were driven, unlike today when they need to be lead and encouraged and definitely included in what to do and how to do it.

Men did not have to be skilled way back then, just strong in the arm and weak in the head!

I think I can safely say that the technicians we employ today are extremely skilled and proud of what they do.