The farming column with Sam Walton

After the Winter Barley we used a five-leg subsoilers with discs behind and a roller behind that.
After the Winter Barley we used a five-leg subsoilers with discs behind and a roller behind that.

Cultivations are in full swing after August had kept up it’s reputation of traditionally being the wettest month.

We are trying something different this year on some of the land.

I suppose with all the large heavy machinery in vogue these days, it is inevitable that the land will become compacted and if we go many years without subsoiling, then we will get a plough pan.

So after the winter barley we used a five-leg subsoilers with discs behind and a roller behind that.

It was left in a condition good enough to drill rape into. Hopefully it will be cheaper than ploughing and then power harrowing.

It was obvious to the tractor driver that the land below plough depth was very tight and could feel the tractor jerking slightly so he did it twice over. He made an excellent job. So perhaps we can go around the farm in turn, so many fields each year, depending of course on the weather. It would not be ideal if the land was soaked.

No such problems existed with horses and gradually as machinery appeared, farming practises altered accordingly and they keep on altering as we go along and take a bit of keeping up with.

What also takes time is keeping up with the red tape which goes with everything we do now. I suspect that most of it is unnecessary, but of course, common sense has gone out of the window and no farmer in his right mind would do anything to harm either man, machine or beast.

Currently I am tussling with whether or not to replace my ELS scheme with the new mid-tier, or just leave 7% of arable acreage as greening and not have any schemes.

Maybe I should just get a proper job. However, red tape has found it’s way into every sphere of work so maybe I should stay as I am and persevere.