Galapagos talk delivered to Pocklington Probus Club members

Probus Club chairman Chris Dodd, Denise Massey, Gerald Massey and Harold Phillips, who introduced the speakers.
Probus Club chairman Chris Dodd, Denise Massey, Gerald Massey and Harold Phillips, who introduced the speakers.

At the August meeting of Pocklington Probus Club, Denise and Gerald Massey from Driffield provided members with a lively presentation about the volcanic Galapagos Islands.

The islands straddle the equator some 600 miles off the west coast of South America.

Charles Darwin’s 1835 visit to Galapagos had a significant impact of the formation of his theory on the Origin of Species.

Denise presented a wide-ranging selection of her photographs while Gerald narrated the story of their fortnight’s visit to the islands in 2016.

As part of a small conducted tour they had been privileged to see many of the islands’ indigenous species of animals, reptiles and birds.

In addition to giant tortoises, weighing 350 kilos and the renowned iguanas, Gerald and Denise also introduced club members to a wide variety of species including the Sally Lightfoot crab, the lesser yellow-legs duck, the frigate bird and the blue-footed booby.

Indeed, it was this last bird that created one of the reasons for their visit.

Denise had been entranced by the dance of the blue-footed booby ever since she had seen it in a Hans and Lotte Hass TV programme some 50 years ago.

Gerald emphasised the huge regeneration programme that Ecuador has undertaken to ensure the islands maintain and enhance their unique range of endangered fauna and flora, including strict control on visitor numbers and the supervision of all access and visits to, the Galapagos.