One in eight toddlers do not get mandatory health check-ups, new figures show

Out of 770 two-year-olds in the East Riding, 105 did not see a health visitor between April and June 2019, the latest data from the Department of Health and Social Care shows. Photo: PA Images
Out of 770 two-year-olds in the East Riding, 105 did not see a health visitor between April and June 2019, the latest data from the Department of Health and Social Care shows. Photo: PA Images

One in eight toddlers in the East Riding are not receiving mandatory check-ups from health visitors, new figures suggest.

Local authority health visitors, who assess a child’s development, are supposed to carry out four checks during a child’s early years: straight after birth, at six-to-eight weeks, at one year and then between two and two-and-a-half years.

This support is vital in establishing young children’s good health and development, Public Health England says.

Out of 770 two-year-olds in the East Riding, 105 did not see a health visitor between April and June 2019, the latest data from the Department of Health and Social Care shows – meaning 86% did.

The figures also show that 5% of the children in the East Riding of Yorkshire did not receive their one-year review.

Lee Barnett, from the children’s healthcare charity Tree of Hope, said that a lack of staff and coordination between teams and services meant health visits are being missed.

Chairman of the Local Government Association’s community wellbeing board, Ian Hudspeth, said: “Health visitors working in local government play a pivotal role in helping ensure all children get the best possible start in life.

“In some areas, councils are having to make difficult decisions to ensure the most vulnerable and complex cases are getting the help they need, due to a shortage of qualified health visitors.”