Dozens of unqualified teachers are working at state schools in the East Riding

Teachers require QTS to work in schools overseen by councils. Photo: PA Images
Teachers require QTS to work in schools overseen by councils. Photo: PA Images

Dozens of unqualified teachers were working at state schools in the East Riding last year, figures reveal.

Teachers’ union NASUWT said that every child has the right to be taught by a qualified teacher, and called for the Government to force schools to hire fully trained staff.

Department for Education data shows there were the equivalent of 2,006 full-time classroom teachers in the area’s state-funded schools in 2018.

But 36 of those neither had qualified teacher status nor were working towards it.

Teachers require QTS to work in schools overseen by councils. It means about one in 50 teachers in the East Riding state schools do not have QTS, which is gained after getting a recognised teaching qualification and completing practical training.

Kevin Courtney, joint general secretary of the National Education Union, said the use of non-QTS teachers demonstrates the teacher recruitment and school funding crisis.

He added: “It is vital that the Government addresses the root causes of teacher recruitment and retention, and starts to give schools the funding they need to ensure every child has the education they deserve.”

A Department for Education spokesperson said: “More than 95% of teachers in state-funded schools have qualified teacher status and last year saw an additional 34,500 new trainee teachers recruited, despite an extremely competitive labour market and the lowest levels of unemployment for decades, showing that teaching continues to be an attractive profession.”