Your article: Project reveals village is steeped in history

Marian and Richard Myerscough looking at some of the finds, with Dr Peter Halkon.
Marian and Richard Myerscough looking at some of the finds, with Dr Peter Halkon.

A project to discover more about the history of a medieval village is now complete, after an exhibition was held to display the findings of the research.

Almost four years ago several residents from Nunburnholme expressed an interest to find out more about the heritage of the village. They applied to the Heritage Lottery Fund for funding and were successful, receiving a grant of £28,000.

John Hill with his display of photographs.

John Hill with his display of photographs.

The results of ‘Exploring a Yorkshire Wolds’ Village - Nunburnholme, a Community Heritage Project’ were put on show last Sunday during an exhibition held in Nunburnholme’s St James’ Church.

The exhibition included information and finds from two archaeological excavations on Nunburnholme Wold, led by Dr Peter Halkon, which revealed an Iron Age settlement and two Iron Age burials, excavated from a cemetery of more than 20 square barrows, detected by geophysical survey and aerial photography. Evidence of enclosures, drove ways and ditches indicating various activities on the wold top were also discovered.

The geophysical survey led by James Lyall also revealed more information about the medieval village, including the site of the nunnery which put the Nun- in Nunburnholme and the intriguing earthworks around the church. Geologist Richard Myerscough, along with other experts, resurveyed the area with a group of villagers and found a new geological fault. The pottery and other remains recovered from community excavations, mole hill surveys and field walking were also on display on Sunday.

The exhibition consisted of ten free standing banners showing archaeology from the mesolithic period to medieval times, details of the medieval Viking Age Cross and nunnery site. Two local artists, Amanda Rosevere and Emma Jane Whelan, created artistic impressions of the Iron Age settlement on Nunburnholme Wold and medieval Brunnham, the name of the village before it was renamed Nunburnholme.

Nunburnholme Iron Age complex.

Nunburnholme Iron Age complex.

Another aspect of the project involved a group of local people forming a house research party to undertake workshops led by Annika Nickson, who assisted with research into case studies of three houses in the village. This revealed very interesting information about each building which was displayed on two banners at the exhibition.

The photographic evidence of the many community led projects was impressive, showing a range of activities from geophysical surveys to a living history video, by John Hill, featuring Peter Wilkinson, who has lived in the village all his life.

A spokesperson for the project said: “We were kindly supported by professionals who generously gave their time and expertise to enhance our knowledge. Many thanks to all the people from our village, and others, who participated and supported the project, particularly the archaeology students from the University of Hull.”