Antiques column with William Wilson MNAVA

An early dinky toy, which in battered condition, realised �260 at auction this year.
An early dinky toy, which in battered condition, realised �260 at auction this year.

Toy cars have become an important collecting field.

These cars first begun to appear at the start of the 20th Century but it was not until after the war years (when more real life cars also appeared) that their popularity grew.

William Wilson, right, a specialist at Chris Clubley auctioneers in Market Weighton.

William Wilson, right, a specialist at Chris Clubley auctioneers in Market Weighton.

Toy cars can either be tinplate or diecast.

Diecast toy cars produced when alloy was injected into a mould under pressure.

Frank Hornby was responsible for the first “dinky toys” produced in 1934.

Interestingly the cars originally were produced, not as a toys in their own right, but as accessories to model railway sets.

Matchbox cars, manufactured by Lesney, first appeared on the market in 1953.

Lensey first produced the models of Yesteryear range in 1956. The Corgi range of model cars also drove into production in 1956.

Dinky, Corgi and tin-plate clockwork cars were followed by battery operated tin plate cars. The vast majority of such cars being produced in Japan.

Model car collectors often focus their collection on cars produced before the 1970s. The 1960s is often regarded as the heyday of diecast cars.

In the 1960s great attention was paid to model car detail, for example opening windows, as manufacturers realised there was an adult audience beside that of children.

The next Clubleys sale, Saturday 12 November, has a small dinky toy collection. Further details online nearer the time at www.clubleys.com.